Kerék-Bárczy says teachers are being personally and professionally humiliated

February 9, 2016

kerekbarczy

“The teachers are being personally and professionally humiliated. This is unsustainable. KLIK needs to be wound up. This whole centralization needs to be wound up. The key here is that we need to listen to what the teachers have to say. The government can try to convene roundtable discussions but the time has finally come for them to act.”

Democratic Coalition (DK) politician Szabolcs Kerék-Bárczy told ATV Tuesday morning the government is deliberately withholding national debt figures, and teachers’ union PSZ would not take part in the government’s roundtable on public education later in the day because they do not consider it a serious attempt to fix the country’s poor education system.

National debt

According to Kerék-Bárczy, parliament adopted legislation in 2015 allowing the Minister of National Economy to exercise his own discretion in determining whether he should release the numbers, which “may  endanger Hungary’s external financing opportunities”.

Kerék-Bárczy said the law allowing the minister to decide is “completely absurd”.

“This is information in the public interest,” he said.  “Every citizen has the right to know how much the national debt is because this debt is shared by the public.

“It’s very clear that the Orbán government lied when it came to power in 2010 because they promised that they would drive down the national debt. We see now that the national debt has increased over the past six years. There is definitely a tendency that shows stagnation, if not an increase.”

Teachers’ unions

Kerék-Bárczy said the teachers’ unions are right to be skeptical about the government’s roundtable discussion on the future of public education.

“I think they are right to find the government’s intentions suspect,” the opposition politician said. “They do not believe anything that Minister of Human Resources Zoltán Balog says.”

Concerning the Klebelsberg Institution Maintenance Center (KLIK) created in 2012 to maintain Hungary’s public schools, Kerék-Bárczy said it is a “bad organization” and its problems “will not be solved by moving around undersecretaries”.

“The entire organization needs to be disbanded and the government needs to start taking people seriously. Teachers play the most important role in the lives of Hungarian people and their families because we entrust our children to them every day for many hours. The teachers are being personally and professionally humiliated. This is unsustainable. KLIK needs to be wound up. This whole centralization needs to be wound up. The key here is that we need to listen to what the teachers have to say. The government can try to convene roundtable discussions but the time has finally come for them to act.”