Politics Can Be Different gets boost after Botka drops out

October 9, 2017

The popularity of Politics Can Be Different (LMP) increased after the resignation of László Botka last week as the Socialist Party’s prime ministerial candidate, according to a new survey by pollster Publicus, index.hu reports.

The poll, ordered by the weekly Vasárnapi Hírek, found that although the Socialist Party (MSZP) lost some of its voters as an effect of Botka resigning, most voters do not think that this event alone significantly altered the chances of left-wing opposition parties in the 2018 election.

Botka’s remarks on members of his party’s alleged ties to the ruling Fidesz party, and his resignation itself, clearly damaged the already struggling reputation of MSZP. According to Publicus, the Socialist Party’s popularity fell by two percent compared to the last survey, and now stands at 10 percent. The survey found that voters who left MSZP migrated to LMP, which now stands at five percent. Support of other parties has not changed recently:

  • Fidesz 25%
  • Jobbik 11%
  • Democratic Coalition (DK) 4%
  • The Hungarian Two-tailed Dog Party 1%
  • The support of Together (Együtt), Liberals, and Dialogue for Hungary (PM) does not reach 1%
Source: Publicus Research

Despite the low popularity of the opposition parties, some 56 percent of all respondents would still prefer a change of government in 2018.

Source: Publicus Research

Based on the findings of the survey, some 45 percent of all respondents think that Botka’s resignation does not affect significantly the left’s chances in the election. At the same time, only 17 percent of the respondents think that Botka’s resignation significantly worsens the left’s chance of winning.

Source: Publicus Research

According to the survey, only some 44 percent of all respondents think that the left could still win the election with a new prime ministerial candidate, compared to the 49 percent who think that the left has no chance at all.

Politics Can Be Different gets boost after Botka drops out
Source: Publicus Research

Despite this, 43 percent of all respondents would still vote for a left-wing coalition. Interestingly, 53 percent of those respondents who support Jobbik would also vote for a left-wing coalition.

Source: Publicus Research

Publicus conducted the survey between October 4 and 5 on a 792-person representative sample.