Viktor Orbán endorses Trump, opposes democracy-building

August 24, 2016

Rio de Janeiro, 2016. augusztus 20. Orbán Viktor miniszterelnök (k) beszédet mond az államalapítás ünnepe alkalmából rendezett ünnepségen a riói Magyar Házban 2016. augusztus 19-én. Jobbról Schmitt Pál volt köztársasági elnök, a Nemzetközi Olimpiai Bizottság (NOB) tagja (j) és Thomas Bach, a NOB elnöke. MTI Fotó: Illyés Tibor
Prime Minister Viktor Orbán visited Rio de Janeiro to attend the Summer Olympic Games

“Trump’s foreign policy would be the best for us. The Democrats believe that the entry of migrants into Europe need not be controlled, and this is very dangerous. . . . Migrants come to Europe with a different culture and mentality.  These parallel societies are dangerous and destabilize the countries of the EU. We would like Hungary to remain as an integrated society.” – Viktor Orbán, Prime Minister of Hungary

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán has once again endorsed the candidacy of Donald Trump for President of the United States.

According to the Brazilian newspaper Folha de S. Paulo, at a reception in the Itamaraty Palace in Rio de Janeiro, Brazilian Foreign Minister José Serra asked Orbán whether he indeed supports Trump.

Orbán replied: “Yes. Trump’s foreign policy would be the best for us. The Democrats believe that the entry of migrants into Europe need not be controlled, and this is very dangerous. Trump is in favor of screening immigrants. He is further opposed to democracy-building in other countries, and on this issue we are in agreement.”

The prime minister travelled to Rio last week to attend the Olympic Games.  While there he met with several high-ranking officials of the International Olympics Committee and members of the Brazilian government.

Just barely a month ago, in a speech delivered at the “Tusványos Free University” summer camp in Băile Tușnad, Romania, Orbán expressed his hope that Trump would be the next President of the United States.

In his speech, he said Trump was right on three points, namely that immigration is bad and dangerous; it is necessary to expand the clandestine services; and it is necessary to give up trying to export democracy, and in its place endeavor for stable relations to prevail in the countries of the Middle East.

Orbán’s statement saw him become the first head of state in the world to openly support Trump.

Parallel societies are dangerous

In his interview given to Folha de S. Paulo, Orbán spoke of the current refugee crisis as well. When asked whether the arrival of refugees would help solve the European Union’s demographic problems, he said: “Never. They may cause an even more serious problem, because they build parallel societies in Europe. Migrants come to Europe with a different culture and mentality.  These parallel societies are dangerous and destabilize the countries of the EU. We would like Hungary to remain as an integrated society.”

He also told the newspaper that “the European countries are unable to keep the promise they made to Turkey” to drop the visa requirement for Turkish citizens.  In the wake of last month’s failed coup, Turkey has insisted the EU commit to a date by which Turkish citizens will no longer require a visa to travel to the European Union, as a condition for preventing Syrian war refugees and asylum seekers from passing through Turkey on their way to Europe.

Orbán takes the view that the issue of granting visa-free travel to Turkish people is “an enormous problem and a highly sensitive issue”, but as far as he is concerned he is not worried about Ankara’s threats.

“Turkey is unable to follow through on these threats because the Hungarian border is also the entrance into Europe, and we are protecting our border one hundred percent,” he asserted.

Supporting the Turkish government

In the interview Orbán spoke out for the mandate of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and the stability of Turkey.

“If there is no stability in Turkey it will cause a problem for the entire region. We must support the Turkish government.”

At the same time, he said the reintroduction of the death penalty in Turkey would divert the Eurasian country from the path leading to the EU.